IBM names Firefox its default browser

From CNET News.com: Firefox has become the default browser for nearly 400,000 IBM employees, a big coup for the open-source project during a time of increasing browser competition.

"All IBM employees will be asked to use it as their default browser," Bob Sutor, vice president of open source and Linux at IBM's Software Group, said in a blog post Thursday. "Firefox is enterprise-ready, and we're ready to adopt it for our enterprise."

Cisco Cius Android Tablet Debuts

From DailyTech: Cisco has announced a new mobile device that combines a business telephone system with a tablet for video conferencing and video calls. The device is called the Cisco Cius. The Cius weighs 1.15 pounds and allows the benefits of Cisco collaboration applications in a secure mobile platform. The device supports HD video streaming and real-time video along with multi-party conferencing.

Microsoft Debuts Data Visualization Tool

From PC World: Microsoft has released a controller for its Silverlight multimedia software that can present dynamic visual summaries of large data sets in Web browsers.

Developed by the company's Live Labs research group, PivotViewer can visualize large collections of data in such a way to make them easier to order and analyze.

Foxconn to Build New China Plant

From DailyTech: A local notice posted on the government bulletin board in Henan city of Hebei points to Foxconn moving ahead with plans to build another massive city-sized manufacturing town nearby.

The creation of the new Northern plant marks Foxconn's latest bid to stem the tide of suicides and disgruntled employees. Foxconn has tried a variety of schemes to stem the suicides -- buddhist monks, letters asking employees not to kill themselves, and most recently safety nets.

Sony to recall half-million laptops on heat risk

From CNET News.com: Sony announced Wednesday that it plans to recall around 535,000 Vaio laptops due to overheating problems.

The company said that a flaw in the temperature control can create an excessive buildup of heat that distorts the shape of the unit. Though Sony hasn't heard of any problems with the Vaio in Japan, it said it received 39 complaints of overheating and distortion from customers abroad.

Sun Microsystems Was Working on Low-Power x86 Microprocessor

From X-bit Labs: Sun Microsystems had been working on a low-power server x86 chip that could power cloud or hyperscale datacenters, according to a media report. Unfortunately, it seems that the chip was scrapped after Oracle acquired Sun.

Nvidia Rolls Out 3D Vision Surround Display Technology

From X-bit Labs: Nvidia Corp. on Tuesday officially enabled its 3D Vision Surround technology which allows to span stereoscopic 3D image across three displays. The feature initially works only on the latest graphics processors and only on beta drivers, but that limitation is hardly too crucial, considering the price end-users would have to pay for an Nvidia 3D Vision Surround setup.

iPhone 4 business users get remote data wiping

From InfoWorld: Businesses worried about keeping tabs on the latest Apple iPhone will soon be able to remotely interact with the devices in the event of theft, loss or mishap, Absolute Software has announced.

Using an update due in the next quarter, Absolute Software will enable Apple iPhones running iOS 4 to be remotely managed like any other portable computer using the company's Absolute Manage system, the company said.

Samsung Galaxy S Shines at New York Launch

From PC World: It may or may not turn out to be the game-changer Samsung says it is, but the Samsung Galaxy S, now in four flavors for four carriers, is indeed a top-shelf smartphone with an astoundingly vibrant screen that puts it in a class by itself-for the moment.

Amazon.com experiences hours-long outage

From CNET News.com: Amazon.com experienced a widespread outage on Tuesday that lasted, at least for many customers, more than three hours and displayed blank or partial pages instead of product listings.

By mid-afternoon, Amazon's home page was devoid of any product photographs and showed only a list of categories on the left of the screen. Searching for items often didn't work, and customers' shopping carts and saved item lists were temporarily displayed as empty.

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