Nvidia quietly launches the GeForce GT 1030, a Radeon RX 550 rival with a modest price

From PC World: Surprise! Nvidia very quietly announced an affordable new graphics card late Tuesday for e-sports and HTPC enthusiasts, dubbed the GeForce GT 1030.

The new GeForce card notably lacks the “X” in GTX, going instead with the more mundane GT—a name we haven’t seen since the 700 series. That’s because the new GT 1030, while still using the Pascal architecture, is a low-power card purpose built to fight off the Radeon RX 550 introduced in April.

Qualcomm sues iPhone manufacturers as Apple battle escalates

From CNET: Qualcomm filed a breach of contract complaint against Apple's manufacturers on Wednesday, nearly one month after the iPhone maker stopped paying for the chip company's patent royalties.

Apple's manufacturers, like Foxconn, used to pay Qualcomm for the intellectual property rights to make chips that connect phones online. The legal battle between Apple and Qualcomm has been heating up as the two companies brawl over who has licensing rights to the processor technology.

AMD's first Radeon Vega graphics card isn't for you, and gamers may be waiting a while

From PC World: Nvidia’s not the only graphics card maker with “FE” cards anymore—but the “F” in AMD’s debut Radeon Vega card stands for “frontier” rather than “founders,” and it definitely isn’t for PC gamers. In fact, the one tidbit that is relevant for gamers may disappoint, as it seems likely that consumer versions of Vega are further off than expected.

HPE shows off The Machine prototype without memristors

From InfoWorld: In 2004, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise's Kirk Bresniker set out to make radical changes to computer architecture with The Machine and drew out the first concept design on a whiteboard.

At the time Bresniker, now chief architect at HP Labs, wanted to build a system that could drive computing into the future. The goal was to build a computer that used cutting-edge technologies like memristors and photonics.

It's been an arduous journey, but HPE on Tuesday finally showed a prototype of The Machine at a lab in Fort Collins, Colorado.

AMD's Ryzen Mobile chips are ready for liftoff, with the new Ryzen Pro not far behind

From PC World: With the Ryzen 3, 5, and 7 chips already out the door for desktop PCs, AMD’s preparing its next assault: the mobile market, with a Ryzen Mobile chip that promises to outperform AMD’s current mobile processor by a whopping 50 percent.

Ford might cut global workforce by 10 percent, reports claim

From CNET: The Michigan Supreme Court ruling for Dodge v. Ford Motor Company, 1919 held that the goal of a corporation is to advance the interests of its shareholders ahead of providing charitable benefits for customers or employees. A new report offers a real-world example of how that works.

Ford will allegedly cut approximately 10 percent of its global workforce in order to bolster corporate profits and stem stock-price bleeding, The Wall Street Journal reports, citing sources close to the plan. Reuters is also claiming the same thing, according to its sources.

HTC unveils the U11, a gorgeous 5.5-inch flagship phone with Amazon Alexa support

From PC World: You won’t want to hide the HTC U11 in a protective case. HTC’s new flagship phone is just too stunning to conceal behind a chintzy polycarb shell. Imbued with HTC’s new “liquid” design aesthetic, the U11 has an impossibly glossy finish, evoking the T-1000 Terminator for those old enough to remember that robot assassin.

Cybercrooks fight over DDoS attack resources

From InfoWorld: As more groups get into the denial-of-service attack business they're starting to get in each other's way, according to a report released this morning.

That translates into a smaller average attack size, said Martin McKeay, senior security advocate at Cambridge, Mass.-based Akamai Technologies.

Microsoft blames US stockpiled vulnerability for ransomware attack

From PC World: Microsoft on Sunday said a software vulnerability stolen from the U.S. National Security Agency has affected customers around the world, and described the spread of the WannaCrypt ransomware on Friday in many countries as yet another example of the problems caused by the stockpiling of vulnerabilities by governments.

Google wants to solve the Android update problem once and for all

From InfoWorld: If there’s one thing we hate about Android phones, it’s the lack of regular and speedy updates for all but Google’s own Pixel series. Whenever a new version of Android comes out, even just a small one, it takes LG, Samsung, Sony, HTC, and everyone else months to push out an update to their latest smartphones. And if you don’t have a flagship Android smartphone, you’re lucky to get an update at all.

But a major change coming to Android O might make our hand-wringing a thing of the past.

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